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The Nordic 0-24 project has been a collaboration between all the Nordic countries and autonomous areas to improve follow-up of vulnerable children and young people. Fafo has carried out an evaluation of the project. A key point of the evaluation is the importance of putting children and young people at the centre and taking their perspective when creating and developing services, as well in the general follow-up.

On the 26th of November 2020 at 10:00–16:00 CET, the Danish Ministry of Employment is hosting a webinar on Nordic Future of Work under the auspices of the Danish chairmanship of the Nordic Council of Ministers.

 

The Fafo-led project "The future of work: Opportunities and challenges for the Nordic models" examines a wide range of aspects of how our Nordic societies are prepared for the future. This report seeks to reveal whether there is a need to adapt Nordic labour law to future working relationships, and, if so, how such an adaptation can preserve the purpose and functions of the laws. The report is comissioned by the Nordic Council of Ministers.

Since 2004, migrant workers from Central and Eastern Europe have had a central role in maintaining Norway’s production level, especially in industries as construction and manufacturing. The covid-19 virus has made the situation very difficult for many labour migrants. They have experienced quarantines, travel restrictions and closed worksites. However, even before the “shut-down”, it seemed like the Norwegian labour market had become less attractive for the migrants. What can we expect in the years to come?

This article, written by Ingunn Bjørkhaug, discusses how Uganda’s refugee policies create economic profit for some but poverty for others. As a result, its welcoming open door is on the verge of collapse.

An article by Roy A. Nielsen and Tove Midtsundstad investigates whether introducing workplace health-promotion interventions targeting employees with health problems or reduced work ability, as is the aim of the Norwegian establishments’ Inclusive Working Life (IWL) agreement, affected overall sick leave and disability risk.

Based on data from 2000 to 2010, the study finds that such interventions affected overall sickness absence and disability risk only to a minor degree. However, this was mainly due to interventions only having an impact in parts of the labour market. Furthermore, the interventions reduced disability risk but increased sickness absence. Retaining employees with health problems may then cause an increase in sickness absence, although the study suggests that they prolong working careers for some.